58 “American Idol” Alums Reveal What The Show Meant To Them

Since 2002, American Idol has discovered unknown talented singers and offered them the chance to achieve superstar status. But that all ends on April 7, when the show’s 15th and final winner will be crowned.

Along the way, hundreds of performers have been featured, and while not everyone has reached the heights of Kelly Clarkson or Jennifer Hudson, many have left indelible marks on the hearts and ears of the viewers who did “Dial Idol” for them.

In anticipation of the finale, BuzzFeed News asked past contestants – some in person, some over the phone, and some via email – to reflect upon how the show has changed their lives. Below are their slightly edited responses.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Justin Guarini, Season 1

 
 

Justin Guarini, Season 1

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

American Idol is the fire that took a raw and hungry kid and helped shape him into a solid veteran of the business. Thanks to Idol, I have never wanted for opportunities, and have been blessed to entertain people all over the world. Fifteen years, and it still feels like yesterday when I stepped out onto that stage for the first time and began the exciting journey of following my dreams.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Paul McDonald, Season 10

 
 

Paul McDonald, Season 10

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

“It was the validation for all of my awkward years! I spent hours in my room singing in my hairbrush; playing my Yamaha; forming girl groups in my neighborhood; instead of playing with Barbies, lining them up to be my audience while others played outside. It was a great stepping-stone for learning this business, curbing my sensitivity, and forming thicker skin. It allowed me to vocally challenge my palette, become a workaholic and reliable professionally. I appreciate every critique even more now. Huge thanks to the judges, guest judges, producers, vocal coaches, makeup artists, stylists, cameramen, bodyguards, and assistants. Because of all of you, I see the bigger picture!”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Trenyce, Season 2

 
 

Trenyce, Season 2

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

“I always knew I wanted to be an artist and American Idol made it possible for me to make it a reality. I owe everything to the fans that not only voted me to a fourth-place finish, but helped me realize my dream of being a country artist. American Idol and all those who made the show possible will forever have my appreciation and thanks.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Kimberley Locke, Season 2

 
 

Kimberley Locke, Season 2

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

American Idol represents so many things in my life. Everything that I had been practicing up until the age of 24, I had to put it into action. The show was instrumental to my growth as a singer and as a woman. It is such an honor to be a part of a show that not only changed my life but changed the lives of millions of people across the country, who were sitting in their living rooms watching. I am proud to have been a part of the inspirational phenomenon called American Idol.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Ruben Studdard, Season 2

 
 

Ruben Studdard, Season 2

 
 
 
 
 

Vince Bucci / Getty Images

 
 
 
 
 

American Idol has meant opportunity and it has meant a family; some of the people I’m closest to in my life to this day are because of my relationship with American Idol.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Jon Peter Lewis, Season 3

 
 

Jon Peter Lewis, Season 3

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

“Over the years, I’ve done my fair share of poking fun at American Idol, but the show deserves a sincere love note. So, let’s pretend this is me holding a boom box outside the American Idol window, playing Peter Gabriel songs.

 

Idol has gone to greater lengths than most to make the world accessible for undiscovered talent. And they found me. My time spent on the show became a defining moment in my life. I hated all the song-and-dance numbers they made me do, but I’ve been able to make music, travel the world, and fulfill so many childhood dreams. That’s a pretty fair trade. And I’d do it again. I mean, I went on The Voice, after all. So, thanks for the fond memories. With love, from me to you.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Josh Gracin, Season 2

 
 

Josh Gracin, Season 2

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

“It was a wonderful springboard for me and so many others like me who would have never had the opportunity to pursue a career as a performer. I went into my first audition with no expectations of getting any further. The first audition snowballed into the second round, then the third, and then became like a runaway train where all of a sudden, I was in the top 10. American Idol introduced me to artists and gave me a look into the music and television industry. If I could go back and do things differently, I would. There are always things you want to change about the past, but I am very proud of the time I spent on the show, on the tour, and all of the great opportunities that came from that time.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

LaToya London, Season 3

 
 

LaToya London, Season 3

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

American Idol was the platform in which I became known worldwide. They chose me out of 70,000 people to showcase my artistry and I’m so thankful for that. This farewell season is a bit sad for me because American Idol has been a TV staple in so many homes around America and abroad. It’s the show that pioneered the fan-based voting system, allowing fans to pick who they wanted to see and hear on the radio. American Idol inspired this generation of performers to be bold and go after their musical dreams.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Jasmine Trias, Season 3

 
 

Jasmine Trias, Season 3

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

“I have amazing memories from my time on American Idol. The show completely changed my life. It gave me and so many other artists a platform to be discovered in a way that didn’t exist before. If it wasn’t for American Idol coming to Hawaii, I most likely wouldn’t have been able to pursue my passion for music and realize my dream of becoming a singer. To have had such huge exposure and to have been able to launch my career on the biggest television stage in the world is still unbelievable. It’s something I’m grateful for every day.

“I couldn’t be more proud to be an American Idol top 3 finalist, and I feel honored to be part of its history. I truly appreciate everything that has happened in my career since the show, and it’s all thanks to the opportunity I was given and the support I received. Others will continue to try, but, in my opinion, there will never be another television show quite like it.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Mikalah Gordon, Season 4

 
 

Mikalah Gordon, Season 4

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

“American Idol will always be one of the greatest things I’ve ever done. It changed my life. I remember being 14 years old and watching Kelly Clarkson singing ‘A Moment Like This’ as she was [crowned] the winner. I found so much inspiration and hope watching that season. When I turned 16, I patiently waited in line in hopes of having my dreams come true. Being 16 is tough. You are still trying to find yourself, believe in yourself. But someone was definitely watching over me.

 

“Making it to the top 12 was one of my greatest accomplishments. The friends that I made are lifelong. Being a part of history is humbling, but what I will always keep in my heart is the same feeling I had at 16. I can do anything I put my mind to. Thank you, American Idol. Thank you for taking a chance on a young, naive, big-mouthed little girl from Vegas. Thank you for believing in me and for making me feel so special. From the showrunners, to the producers, to the judges, you changed my life. We are a forever family. American Idol, you mean the world to me. Cheers to an amazing 15 years!”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Constantine Maroulis, Season 4

 
 

Constantine Maroulis, Season 4

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

“I believe it’s about the still-great platform and the journey of the contestants that captured the imagination of fans. But the real work starts when you leave the show.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Anthony Fedorov, Season 4

 
 

Anthony Fedorov, Season 4

 
 
 
 
 

Getty Images

 
 
 
 
 

“I still remember walking into my audition room like it was yesterday. I was 19 years old; clueless, inexperienced, naive. Never in a million years did I imagine that this show would change my life the way it did.

“When I made it on Idol, it was like being in a tornado. Everything was moving so fast for me; every second of every day was planned and scheduled. I’d get up early in the morning – usually a 6 or 7 a.m. call time meant a 4 or 5 a.m. wake-up call, for example, and pulling in a 16-hour day – rehearse, then off to the studio to record. Then photo shoots, commercials, interviews. That was my life, seven days a week for a year! I was just trying to hang on for dear life.

American Idol got me in the door. It gave me so many opportunities that otherwise I probably would not have gotten. The best part of being on the show for me was the Idol tour. When you’re on the show, you’re singing to a live studio audience and that little red dot in the camera, not realizing that there are millions and millions of people on the other side of that lens. You’re in a bubble basically.

“My most profound realization of the Idol experience was that tour when I hit the stage for the first time in front of about 20,000 people. When I finished my set, I got offstage, went into the tent to put my mic pack away, and collapsed on my knees and started crying. I was so overwhelmed with emotion like, Wow, that just happened, and if this all ended tomorrow, I’m so grateful I got to be a part of this experience. It was a moment of sheer gratitude.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Vonzell Solomon, Season 4

 
 

Vonzell Solomon, Season 4

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

American Idol has changed my life tremendously. I went from delivering the mail to traveling the world, doing what I love to do. I am forever grateful!”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Bo Bice, Season 4

 
 

Bo Bice, Season 4

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

“My American Idol experience was life-changing, to say the least. From the beginning ’til the finale I made new friends, gained knowledge on my craft, and also started to see that the dreams of my past were the foundation of my future … and Idol could be the catalyst of it all.

 

“I’ve never had a moment of regret – only good memories, wonderful friendships, and a feeling of accomplishment. American Idol also encouraged me to give back to the next generation of performers coming up the ranks, by developing my own performance curriculum and starting my own performance school to teach the stars of the future to make their dreams come true.

“So, if Bo Bice could sum up what he’d like to say to American Idol, Simon Fuller, the producers, stage crew, Rickey Minor, and the band, vocal coaches, choreographers, camera crew, Nigel Lythgoe, and Ken Warwick, catering, every last person involved, I would simply say, ‘Thank you for my career, and I love you all.’

“It was a great run, American Idol family. I’m proud to be a small part of the life-changing experience.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

“To most Idol alums, American Idol was a platform, a wonderful platform that catapulted us into instant stardom. There aren’t many shows that guarantee 35 million viewers every night, and back on Season 5, that’s how many people were tuning in. My story is very different than most Idol contestants because I had two dreams that I was trying to live at the same time. As a high school senior, I had a basketball scholarship to my dream school, Boston College, and I was standing on the American Idol stage, singing with a band for the first time in my life.

 

“When I got eliminated at ‘lucky 13th’ place, I thought my dream of singing was over. Little did I know, even though I didn’t come even close to winning the show, I have had more ‘success’ than most American Idol finalists. Being on Idol has opened up opportunities to travel the world, sing at big-time arenas and esteemed national stages, release albums, start my own record company, secure sponsors, meet incredible leaders, and pay my bills. I look into the mirror every day and feel grateful for the opportunities I’ve been given over the past 10 years since competing on the show.

“The only thing I wish I could change were my outfit choices back in 2006. Gaucho pants, anyone?”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Bucky Covington, Season 5

 
 

Bucky Covington, Season 5

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

“Being from a small town in North Carolina, to be able to sing for a living almost seems like a virtually impossible dream to have. You almost have to be Tim McGraw’s cousin or know somebody in the business. And I think American Idol really has been, all these years, a great avenue to put an image together: a name with a face with a sound. And you can go to Los Angeles, Nashville, New York, or wherever it may be and get a foot in the door. It has always been that, and I hate really seeing that go away.

 

“The best thing about Idol was not being on the show; the worst thing about Idol is being on the show – it’s very stressful; you come out of one life and go into a whole different kind of life. Coming off Idol is probably the best part about Idol for the fact that you are able to go into places and they know who you are. When you’re sitting down at a lunch table with a president of a record company, asking him for a record deal, usually that is a very, very, very tough, stressful process. But when you can’t get through the lunch without people coming over, wanting pictures and autographs, that guy would be a complete idiot to not sign you.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Kellie Pickler, Season 5

 
 

Kellie Pickler, Season 5

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

American Idol means the world to me. It changed my world. It enabled my dreams to become a reality and paved the way for me to go to Nashville and do what I love. It changed my life. I’m so blessed to have been a part of the show.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Paris Bennett, Season 5

 
 

Paris Bennett, Season 5

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

 
 
 
 
 

“What Idol meant to me was family! I believe I met my closest friends there. I learned so much from each and every one of my peers and I’m still learning from some now! I thank Idol for the opportunity to share my gift and for allowing me to perfect my craft in front of millions! I’m forever appreciative.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Chris Daughtry, Season 5

 
 

Chris Daughtry, Season 5

 
 
 
 
 

Fox

We Tried Natural Makeup Looks To Show Men What “No Makeup” Looks Like

Wake up, sheeple — we are WEARING MAKEUP.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

Jon Premosch / BuzzFeed

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

There’s been a lot of confusion lately about what people without makeup actually look like:

 
 

There's been a lot of confusion lately about what people without makeup actually look like:

 
 
 
 
 

Grace Spelman / BuzzFeed

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Look, we get it. Men love having opinions about the way women look. But we just want to make sure that the next time a man opens his mouth about a woman’s face, he actually knows what he’s talking about.

 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

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Alcoholic Seltzer Exists So You Can Get Drunk AF This Summer

Get crunk. Stay hydrated.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Do you LURRRVEEEE alcohol?

 
 

Do you LURRRVEEEE alcohol?

 
 

Yes. Yes, you do.

 
 
 

20th Century Fox

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

But do you hate the TASTE of alcohol?

 
 

But do you hate the TASTE of alcohol?

 
 

I love the BUZZ, but I dread the BOOZE.

 
 
 

TLC

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Then meet the answer to your prayers: BOOZY SELTZER.

 
 

Then meet the answer to your prayers: BOOZY SELTZER.

 
 

That’s right, people. Spiked mother-effing SELTZERRRRRRR.

 
 
 

spikedseltzer.com

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

This boozy seltzer is gluten-free and contains 6% alcohol, which means it’ll make you as buzzed as a beer would.

 
 

This boozy seltzer is gluten-free and contains 6% alcohol, which means it'll make you as buzzed as a beer would.

 
 

And it only contains six ingredients, according to the company’s website. “All of what you want and none of what you don’t,” SpikedSeltzer master brewer Nick Shields told BuzzFeed.

 
 
 

spikedseltzer.com / Via instagram.com

 
 
 
 
 

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Inside The Surprising Ending Of “Midnight Special”

Warning: The following story contains MAJOR SPOILERS about the ending of Midnight Special.

 
 

Warning: The following story contains MAJOR SPOILERS about the ending of Midnight Special.

 
 

Jaeden Lieberher in Midnight Special.

 
 
 

Warner Bros. Pictures

 
 
 
 
 

Jeff Nichols specializes in films, like 2011’s Take Shelter and 2012’s Mud, with a sense of spare urgency, featuring ambiguous endings high on emotional impact and low on explicit plot resolution. And the writer-director knows that can be frustrating for some moviegoers. “I have people who really love my movies and hate my endings. People I work with,” Nichols told BuzzFeed News with a smile during the SXSW Film Festival. “So it’s a totally fair option. I’m used to it.”

 

But Nichols has never attempted anything quite like the conclusion to his latest movie, Midnight Special. (Warning: As one might expect, MAJOR SPOILERS to the ending follow.)

The film, currently in limited release, is structured as an extended chase sequence between Roy (Michael Shannon) and his son Alton (Jaeden Lieberher), and government and religious figures keen on capturing Alton because of his supernatural powers. A cult known as The Ranch wants the 8-year-old for his ability to project his consciousness into others through his glowing eyes; the government wants him for his ability to intercept encrypted military communications seemingly from thin air. Meanwhile, Roy, his friend Lucas (Joel Edgerton), and, eventually, Alton’s mother, Sarah (Kirsten Dunst), drive relentlessly across the country to get Alton to a specific set of coordinates by a specific date, both communicated to them via Alton. Even after Alton reveals to Roy, Sarah, and Lucas that he is from “a world built on top of ours,” populated by beings like him who have been “watching” humanity “for a very long time,” none of his crew quite know why they are going to this location, or what they’ll find when they arrive — just that it is imperative for Alton’s life that they get him there.

When they all finally reach their destination — a deserted field in the Florida Panhandle — Alton shows them, and the audience, what he means. Underneath a dome of supernatural energy created by Alton, we can suddenly see massive, futuristic structures towering over our world, and populated by beings that appear to be made of pure light.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

Joel Edgerton, Michael Shannon, Jaeden Lieberher, and Kirsten Dunst in Midnight Special.

 
 
 
 

Ben Rothstein / Warner Bros. Pictures

 
 
 
 
 

The sequence, which lasts just a few minutes, is pure science fiction cinema, a bold exercise in metaphysical imagination — and pointedly lacking in any firm answers as to what this parallel world is and who its inhabitants are. But the origin of the film’s ending is grounded in an everyday milestone in Nichols’ life: the birth of his son five and a half years ago.

 

“Our house was very small, but we were freaked-out first-time parents, so we put a baby monitor in the room — even though we could hear everything he did from our bedroom, because we were right next door,” Nichols said of he and his wife becoming a new parents. “But I sat there listening to everything. Every breath, every movement, every sound. And I realized at that point in his life, here was this person who had no concept that just outside the space of his consciousness, there were these two people who cared so deeply for him and were listening to everything he does. We knew everything about every moment. I was struck by that. And that became the basis for this bigger multiverse idea.”

As Nichols began building that idea into a script, he spent a great deal of time thinking through how members of a civilization that exists just beyond our comprehension would live — and how their world would look, design-wise.

 

“I knew they would be advanced,” he said. “I knew that they would be a society that was built off of observation. They can see us, but we can’t see them. So it would make sense that they had kind of built their world kind of around us, on top of ours. So they have buildings that hang off of our buildings, almost like barnacles. Also, they would have a very light footprint, which is part environmental, but also part of the observational nature of this community. They would have stilted structures with these kind of walkways or viewing decks. Also, their buildings would be built out of this kind of glasslike material so that they could see.”

Nichols drew a great deal of his visual inspiration from a short film by Spanish visual effects artist Alex Roman called The Third & the Seventh, an entirely CG animated project that displaced known works of architecture into remote locations. “So he has, like, a Calatrava building in the middle of a lake or an ocean,” said Nichols. “He has a beautiful statue in the middle of a wheat field. I was very struck by that.”

Roman was “too busy,” Nichols said, to work directly on Midnight Special, so instead, Nichols turned to Alex McDowell and his company 5D Global Studio, which specifically specializes in CG-based world building. McDowell’s team helped Nichols on everything from the building materials that would make up the parallel city to visually representing how the society may have evolved over time. This evolution was especially prevalent in the architecture of the ancient, obsidian-black gateway through which Alton is transported into the alternate world, his home.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

Kirsten Dunst in Midnight Special.

 
 
 

Warner Bros. Pictures

 
 
 
 
 

“I knew there would be this one very old structure, this staircase, that had been there for a very, very, very, very long time,” Nicholas said. “That’s a nothing spot to us, but that’s maybe a very important spot to them.”

(When asked about the film’s similarities to the 2015 Disney movie Tomorrowland, which also posits a futuristic world that exists in an alternative dimension, Nichols sighed. “I was a little bummed, I guess,” he said of when he first learned about the project. “But the train was rolling at that point. I mean, I was literally doing our effects as that movie was starting to show trailers and stuff. Our die was cast. Sometimes this kind of collective unconscious that we’re all dabbling in, sometimes you’re not the first one out of the gate.”)

While Nichols invested a great deal of time working out how this world would look, he had very little interest in spelling how what precisely it means — or, for that matter, what, exactly, these otherworldly beings are. And that deliberate creative decision is driven by the filmmaker’s larger storytelling philosophy, which values character over plot and emotional catharsis over narrative resolution.

“I’m just thinking about where are my characters at, and what character emotion am I trying to build to,” he said. “What has this whole thing been steamrolling toward, in terms of an emotion? And when you access that emotion at the end of the film, I’m pretty well done. I feel like I’ve accomplished my goal as a storyteller, which is to transfer an emotion over to the audience. Everything else is just kind of like tying up a few things and getting people out of the theater.”

Nichols understands his approach puts him at odds with the vast majority of audience expectations. “They’re expecting it to wrap up or have resolution or just be more knowable, for the dots to connect a little more solidly,” he said. “Which I’m not saying is wrong. I’m not judging it. In fact, if anybody’s wrong, it’s probably me, and I’ll pay for that at the box office.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

Jeff Nichols, Jaeden Lieberher, and Michael Shannon on the set of Midnight Special.

 
 
 
 

Ben Rothstein / Warner Bros. Pictures

 
 
 
 
 

But he is also steadfast in his creative convictions. “It’s very easy to say, ‘Well, Jeff couldn’t quite connect these dots,'” he said. “Well, I wasn’t actually looking at the dots you were looking at.”

To extend the metaphor further, the most obvious set of dots in Midnight Special suggests that Alton is a fallen angel, and the beings who spend their days observing our world live in a kind of sci-fi hereafter. Nichols recognizes how his oblique narrative technique could lead audiences to see Midnight Special as a religious allegory, especially since the followers of The Ranch regard Alton as a messianic figure.

“It’s the easiest way to nod to the Christian myth of, ‘OK, is this a savior? Is this boy the Messiah?’ Because that’s going to be an initial obvious conclusion coming out of [The Ranch],” he said. “Of course that’s what they think he is.”

But, he added, “That’s a bit of a red herring, to be honest.”

“If I wanted this to be a strict representation of some organized belief system, and I was making a movie for Christians, then I would have made a faith-based movie,” he continued. “And when people leave, they would have been very clear about what I was trying to tell them. … I think it’s much more interesting to build a film that someone with a belief in an organized religion, an agnostic, an atheist, a spiritualist — they can all come in and have an experience with the film and project what they need to on it, and then deal with the consequences of what they see after the film.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

Jaeden Lieberher in Midnight Special.

 
 
 

Ben Rothstein / Warner Bros. Pictures

 
 
 
 
 

If anything, Nichols sees Midnight Special as a kind of critique of organized religion. He pointed to the character of Doak (Bill Camp), who is tasked by the leader of the Ranch (Sam Shepard) to capture Alton by any means necessary, including murder. “He knows in his heart that his moral compass is telling him to not do these things,” said Nichols. “But this belief system that he’s bought into, that has been placed on him, trumps that. And that’s evil.

“I grew up Methodist. I went to church on the weekends. I think there are many, many benefits that can come out of an organized religion. But I think organized belief systems become dangerous when a person starts to say, ‘Hey, you know what, I’ve got this figured out. And not only does it work for me, but I’m going to make it work for you too. I’m going to force you to accept this.'”

Even though Nichols remains averse to defining concrete conclusions regarding Midnight Special‘s final minutes, it is clear that he personally sees his movie overall as a kind of allegory — not for religion, but for something even more fundamental: parenthood.

Alton’s parents “believe in their child, and they believe in this idea that he’s going to grow into what he’s meant to be,” he said. “That’s what we’re all doing as parents, trying to figure out what that is. It takes a lot of faith, because it’s believing in the unknown. That’s not attached to Christianity, it’s not attached to Buddhism or anything else. It’s just attached to a parent’s relationship with their child.”

 
 
 

 

More Layoffs Hit Groupon’s Restaurant Software Unit

https://instagram.com/p/5zyXwwsIoc/embed/

 
 
 
 
 

Instagram: @breadcrumbpos

 
 
 
 
 

Breadcrumb, a restaurant software company owned by Groupon, has laid off about 25 employees (or close to one third of its entire staff). Groupon confirmed the cuts to BuzzFeed News.

These layoffs follow another round of cuts from last August which saw Groupon eliminate 20 positions. Breadcrumb had about 100 employees at the time of the first reduction, which means its staff has been almost halved in well under a year.

Sources at Breadcrumb tell BuzzFeed News that the most recent cuts are the first step in a sunsetting process that will likely entail more layoffs. But Groupon contends that its restaurant software business isn’t going anywhere.

“Categorically: Breadcrumb isn’t shutting down or going out of business,” Groupon spokesperson Bill Roberts told BuzzFeed News. “For the great merchants on our platform, absolutely nothing changes.”

Asked how the company will continue to operate after cutting so many employees, Roberts replied: “None of the Breadcrumb engineering team was affected, so we expect absolutely no impact on the product or service.”